Spaying & Neutering

Spaying and neutering your pets, in other words, sterilizing them so they cannot reproduce, is the number one way to help control the population of unwanted animals. Across the world, there are currently more pets than there are available homes for them, and the unlucky animals who don’t have a home have a rough, short life ahead of them. These homeless animals either end up living on the street where they are vulnerable to predators, the elements and disease, or they end up in stressful, claustrophobic shelters where many end up being euthanized. This needless suffering could easily be avoided if more people spayed or neutered their pets.


ONE UNSPAYED FEMALE CAT CAN HAVE A NEW LITTER EVERY 8 MONTHS.
AN UNSPAYED FEMALE DOG CAN HAVE A NEW LITTER EVERY 6 MONTHS.
That’s a lot of kittens and puppies…

infographic_kitty

…And most of them end up LIVING ON THE STREET OR
IN shelters where they are eventually euthanized. not cool.


Myth 1: A pet’s personality changes after being spayed or neutered.

Your pet’s personality will not change after being spayed or neutered, however you will notice that their behaviour improves, especially in males. This is attributed to a slight decrease in testosterone production, which is the only hormone affected by the procedure. Pets will be less likely to try to roam or run away, plus they will be less territorial, making them get along better with other animals and people. Neutering a male cat also eliminates the habit of urinating to mark territory.

Myth 2: Spaying or neutering is unhealthy for my pet

A common misconception about spaying and neutering is that animals become fat and lazy after the procedure. This is not true. Just like all mammals (humans included!) improper diet and lack of exercise is the number one cause weight gain, followed by the natural slowing of the metabolism due to age. Spaying and neutering actually benefits your pet’s health by drastically reducing the chances of developing cancer, especially ones related to the reproductive organs.

Myth 3: I want my pet to have babies so their legacy can live on!

It’s a nice thought, but can you guarantee that your pet’s offspring will be taken care of for the rest of their lives? And if they aren’t spayed or neutered, what about their babies? You are not doing a service to your pet by making them go through the stress of pregnancy, and when their offspring suffer you are not doing honor to their memory. It’s understandable that you’d want something of your pet to live on, but you will never forget your love for them, even you don’t have their offspring.